Gartner forecasts tough second half for PC sales

The second half of the year is going to be a tough one for those in the channel relying on PC sales, as consumers sit on their hands and avoid spending on desktop technology and the collapse of the mini-notebook market continues. According to figures from Gartner, worldwide PC saleswill be up 9.3% t

The second half of the year is going to be a tough one for those in the channel relying on PC sales, as consumers sit on their hands and avoid spending on desktop technology and the collapse of the mini-notebook market continues.

According to figures from Gartner, worldwide PC sales will be up 9.3% this year, down on its previous prediction of 10.5%, with cautious consumer spending having an impact along with cannibalisation of the market by tablets.

The Gartner forecasts come hot on the heels of IDC's downbeat predictions, leaving resellers in little doubt that the prospects for the PC market in the second half of this year are not looking good.

"Consumer mobile PCs are no longer driving growth, because of sharply declining consumer interest in mini-notebooks. Mini-notebook shipments have noticeably contracted over the last several quarters, and this has substantially reduced overall mobile PC unit growth," said Ranjit Atwal, research director at Gartner.

"Media tablets, such as the iPad, have also impacted mobile growth, but more because they have caused consumers to delay new mobile PC purchases rather than directly replacing aging mobile PCs with media tablets," he added.

But it is not all doom and gloom for the PC market with Gartner forecasting more activity in the corporate market as firms look to upgrade old desktops. That activity is going to be driving reseller orders over the next few months.

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