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Fewer IT firms create jobs this year but still above economy average

Karl Flinders

Fewer IT suppliers are creating jobs this year than last year, but the sector is ahead of the average across all sectors, according to research of 700 UK businesses.

Barclays Bank’s Job Creation Survey 2013 found that despite a significant fall of 15% in the number of IT firms creating jobs this year compared with last year, at 63% it beats the cross sector average of 56%.

Of those IT companies creating jobs, 57% are planning to create senior management roles, which is a dramatic increase on the 15% that were creating senior roles last year.

A total of 93% are creating middle management or skilled positions and 37% are planning entry level roles, which is roughly the same as last year.

The research revealed that 69% of technology firms are not expecting to cut jobs this year.

Many businesses in this fast-growing sector are rapidly reinventing and broadening their reach as they add new capabilities to their offerings,” said Sean Duffy, managing director of Barclays’ Technology, Media and Telecoms team. “The significant increase in top level jobs, higher than any other sector, demonstrates how serious these businesses are about achieving their ambitious growth plans.”

Other findings relating to technology companies:

  • 88% of businesses said that the government’s efforts to remove barriers to job creation are having no effect on the business, compared with 84% last year.
  • 59% of firms are not interested in taking on ex-public sector workers, compared with 67% last year.
  • 39% believe ex-public sector workers are not well equipped for a role in their business, compared with 55% last year.
  • 72% said that sales increases lead to job creation, rather than creating jobs in order to drive sales, compared with 84% last year.

This content first appeared on ComputerWeekly.com


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