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Phoenix offers help to flood-stricken SME customers

Alex Scroxton

Phoenix IT Group has launched a business continuity and disaster recovery service called Re:Cover for SME customers across the country who have been affected by the unprecedented severe weather and extensive flooding of recent weeks.

Phoenix, which is itself based close to the banks of the River Nene in Northampton, is offering one year of free service for SME customers taking out a disaster recovery services contract as part of the scheme.

The firm hopes to address the lack of preparedness for extreme weather events among SMEs, and claims many businesses lack a structured and tested disaster recovery plan, which will become even more important as the effects of worldwide climate change ramp up in the coming decades.

Phoenix MD of business continuity, Mike Osborne, said business continuity was no longer the preserve of enterprise and government.

“In the last month alone the UK has seen renewed terrorist attacks, unprecedented flooding and an increase in cyber-attacks,” he said. “In addition, the recent IT outage at Lloyds Bank highlighted the huge reputational impact and financial loss incurred even from a short-lived incident.

“Re:Cover has been exclusively designed for the SME community providing an affordable service, that takes the complexity out of trying to understand where to get started with a business continuity plan and includes all the key elements needed for a credible and successful recovery,” he added.

The service will provide pre-packaged business continuity cover covering a variety of incidents such as fire, flood, gas leaks and so on. Customers will also get access to advisory services such as plan writing, incident management and recovery and restore procedures.

It will make use of Phoenix’s existing network of business continuity centres, which boast 8,000 permanent seats at 18 sites, with contact centre and datacentre services on standby, said Osborne.

“Customers also have data-backup in Phoenix’s secure cloud and access to IT servers and internet connectivity. Most can be back up and running within 24 hours of a total loss,” said Osborne.


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