Opinion

The world didn't end after all

So the world didn’t end on 21 December 2012 and I'm very happy to see that my belief the Mayan prophecy (or misinterpretation of it) was a load of bull has been proven correct.

Unlike the earlier Y2k scare (what a fantastic year or two that was) there hasn't really been a sales boost for the IT industry from this doomsday prophecy. The best bit about Y2k was that when nothing happened after companies spent a fortune to counter the threat, the industry turned around the next day and said "See? It worked."

This time around, there was nothing like that. Stands to reason, really, as I don't think anyone rushed out to buy a server, PC, laptop or tablet because the end of the world was nigh. Which just goes to show that there's a scale of fear or apprehension that applies to encouraging (or scaring) customers to buy more kit. 

If you tell someone it's going to be all over in 24 hours, they're more likely to buy drink or stock up on canned goods and lock themselves away in the basement (if they have one and someone else’s if they don't). However, if you say they could lose all their data if they don't have decent backup, they will probably buy some backup.

So, when you think about it, the people who promoted the idea that the Mayans predicted the end of the world did not do any businesses a favour (except, perhaps, for suppliers of drink, canned goods, shelters, guns and survival gear). I'm not sure what the Mayan marketing plan was way back then, as I obviously wasn't there, but I don't think this was it. Perhaps they were merely pre-planning for the launch of a new calendar which, due to the fact their civilisation was pretty much wiped out, they never got around to putting together.

Hey, there could be a business there. Maybe there could be an app for that. Anyone out there know Mayan? So, since you're reading this after the 21st, whether you're human or alien you can find my app, New Mayan Calendar, in all good app stores and it's only 99p.

This was first published in January 2013

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